NEWS

For ORGANIZATIONS

I have provided consulting services related to technology implementations to various organizations in a variety of industries, ranging from the IT industry to hospitality to government organizations. Similarly, I have also provided consulting services to many companies targeting technologies, hardware and software, to consumers. I provide several different types of consulting services.

Role of Users’ Status Quo on Continuance Intentions

August 26, 2022

[available under Research Papers] Goyal, S., Venkatesh, V., and Shi, X. “Role of Users’ Status Quo on Continuance Intentions,” Information & Management, 2022, 103686. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.im.2022.103686

IT Use and Job Outcomes: A Longitudinal Field Study of Technology Contingencies

August 22, 2022

[available under Research Papers] Venkatesh, Speier-Pero, C., Aljafari, R., and Bala, H. “IT Use and Job Outcomes: A Longitudinal Field Study of Technology Contingencies,” Journal of the AIS, (23:5), 2022, 1184-1210. https://doi.org/10.17705/1jais.00760

Visit to the Department of Management Studies, IIT Delhi

May 2, 2022

Overdue thanks to Arpan Kar and Vigneswara Ilavarasan--and the folks at DMS, IIT Delhi--for being wonderful hosts! Had a good day learning more about DMS and the works of the faculty and PhD students. Had a great Q&A session with about 25 faculty and students in-person and a good number of others online.

Deviant Affordances: When Tensions, Deadlocks and Noncompliance Generate Performance

May 2, 2022

[post-print version available under Research Papers] Haag, S., Eckhardt, A., and Venkatesh, V. “Deviant Affordances: When Tensions, Deadlocks and Noncompliance Generate Performance,” MIS Quarterly, 2023, forthcoming.

Exemplar of Mixed-Methods Research in the Age of Analytics

March 13, 2022

[available under Research Papers] Raman, R., Aljafari, R., Venkatesh, V., and Richardson, V. “Mixed-Methods Research in the Age of Analytics, an Exemplar Leveraging Sentiments from News Articles to Predict Firm Performance,” International Journal of Information Management, 2022.

Road to Success book is open access now

November 4, 2021

Dr. Venkatesh's previously published book titled “Road to Success: A Guide for Doctoral Students and Junior Faculty Members in the Behavioral and Social Sciences” is now available as an OPEN ACCESS PDF through VT (Virginia Tech) Publishing. It is available from the link http://www.vvenkatesh.com/book/ and below is the message Dr. Venkatesh shared on his social media: "I am delighted to share that my previously published book titled “Road to Success: A Guide for Doctoral Students and Junior Faculty Members in the Behavioral and Social Sciences” is now available as an OPEN ACCESS PDF through VT (Virginia Tech) Publishing. In addition to my contributions, the book features chapters by Sue Brown, Andrew Burton-Jones, Gordon Davis, Varun Grover, Likoebe Maruping, and Tracy Ann Sykes. For a nominal fee (to Amazon), you can get a printed paperback copy. It was always my goal to make this book free but the reality of the production and production costs precluded it until now. So, now, I am especially grateful to VT Publishing and specifically Peter Potter and his team for their excellent guidance and work to make this possible. I also appreciate Anol Bhattacherjee’s advice, based on his experience with his wildly successful research methods book. I am also grateful to the tireless efforts of Derya Ipek Eroglu (a PhD student in the BIT department at Pamplin College, VT) over the past several months, starting with exploring various options for open access publishing all the way to finally handling various details to transition the book from its previous format to the new format that includes greater accessibility". #openaccess#research#phdstudents#juniorfaculty https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/104419

Paper awarded the Best Article award published in AMJ in 2017

September 7, 2018

Venkatesh et al. (2017), published in Academy of Management Journal, won the Best Article published in AMJ in 2017. The paper addressed the economic challenges faced by women in Rural India. The paper studied the role of social networks and information and communication technology (ICT) use in the success of women’s entrepreneurial ventures. Academy of Management Journal Best Article award is given to a paper that has produced original, insightful, interesting, important, and theoretically bold research that demonstrates “value-added” contribution to the field’s understanding of the topic and has significant impact on the society.

Paper awarded the Ambassador Award of JOM's Annual Paper Awards 2017

June 2, 2017

Venkatesh et al. (2012), published in Journal of Operations Management, won the Ambassador Award of JOM's annual paper awards 2017. The paper identified the key service attributes driving adoption and use of transactional e-government services to understand how these attributes influenced citizens' intentions, subsequent use and satisfaction.  The Journal Of Operations Management Annual Paper Ambassador Award is given to a paper that has not only been widely cited in the subsequent literature, but also that a significant portion of these citations have appeared in non-OM journal.

Paper awarded the Emerald Group 2016 Citations of Excellence

May 27, 2016

Venkatesh et al. (2013), published in MIS Quarterly, won the Emerald Group 2016 Citations of Excellence award. The paper presented guidelines for conducting mixed methods research. The Emerald Group Publishing awards are granted to highly cited papers that are of high quality.

Journal acceptance MISQ 2016

May 4, 2016

MISQ paper title: User Compensation as a Data Breach Recovery Action: An Investigation of the Sony Playstation Network Breach Authors: Sigi Goode, Hartmut Hoehle, Viswanath Venkatesh, and Susan Brown Abstract: Drawing on expectation confirmation research, we develop hypotheses regarding the effect of compensation on key customer outcomes following a major data breach and consequent service recovery effort. Data were collected in a longitudinal field study of Sony customers during their data breach in 2011. One hundred forty-four customers participated in the two-phase data collection that began when the breach was announced and concluded after reparations were made. Using polynomial modeling and response surface analysis, we demonstrate that a modified assimilation-contrast model explained perceptions of service quality and continuance intention and a generalized negativity model explained repurchase intention. The results of our work contribute to research on data breaches and service failure by demonstrating the impacts of compensation on customer outcomes. We discuss theoretical and practical implications.

Journal acceptance MISQ 2016

March 17, 2016

MISQ paper title: Children’s Internet Addiction, Family-to-Work Conflict, and Job Outcomes: A Study of Parent-Child Dyads Authors: Viswanath Venkatesh, Tracy Sykes, Frank Chan, James Thong, and Paul Hu Abstract: This paper examines the role of parenting behaviors in influencing children’s Internet addiction and the consequences of children’s Internet addiction on parents’ job outcomes. First, we draw on attachment theory to theorize that five parenting behaviors—i.e., parental control, monitoring, unstructured time, dissuasion, and rationalization—affect children’s Internet addiction and their effects are moderated by the children’s views of parent attachment. Second, we draw on research on work-family interface to theorize that children’s Internet addiction affects parents’ job outcomes—i.e., job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and work exhaustion—and the effects are mediated by family-to-work conflict. We tested our hypotheses using an integrated research approach that includes quantitative and qualitative analyses. We conducted an online survey to collect quantitative responses from 776 parent-child dyads. The model testing results showed that the effects of parenting behaviors on children’s Internet addiction, except for dissuasion, were moderated by the children’s views of parent attachment. Also, family-to-work conflict mediated the effects of children’s Internet addiction on parents’ job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and work exhaustion. Further, we collected qualitative data via interviews from 50 parents to cross-validate our model testing results.

Presentation on pursuing the United Nation’s millennium development goals

March 12, 2016

Prof. Venkatesh presented his research on pursuing the United Nation's millennium development goals in India and shared lessons learned from a project in villages in India. Here is an abstract of the presentation:The pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of the United Nations is of economic and social significance to the poorest citizens of less developed countries. Information and communication technologies are seen to have the potential to help achieve these goals. Yet, the presence of a digital divide, which is the gulf between information and communication technology (ICT) haves and have-nots, exists across a variety of demographic, ethnic, and geographic dimensions. Overcoming the digital divide by successfully deploying ICTs in developing countries can have major socioeconomic implications for those countries. ICTs can be a cornerstone for the development of these countries by providing better quality of life through greater access to education, health care, and government. ICT success, typically defined in terms of adoption and use, is rare, with up to 85% failing to some degree in developing countries. The goal of this presentation is to discuss one such large-scale longitudinal (10+ years) research project being conducted in India among over 3,000 farming families across 10 villages. Various completed and working papers from this research project will be briefly discussed.

Lecture on pursuing the United Nation’s millennium development goals in India

March 12, 2016

Prof. Venkatesh presented his research on pursuing the United Nation's millennium development goals in India and shared lessons learned from a project in villages in India. Here is an abstract of the presentation:The pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of the United Nations is of economic and social significance to the poorest citizens of less developed countries. Information and communication technologies are seen to have the potential to help achieve these goals. Yet, the presence of a digital divide, which is the gulf between information and communication technology (ICT) haves and have-nots, exists across a variety of demographic, ethnic, and geographic dimensions. Overcoming the digital divide by successfully deploying ICTs in developing countries can have major socioeconomic implications for those countries. ICTs can be a cornerstone for the development of these countries by providing better quality of life through greater access to education, health care, and government. ICT success, typically defined in terms of adoption and use, is rare, with up to 85% failing to some degree in developing countries. The goal of this presentation is to discuss one such large-scale longitudinal (10+ years) research project being conducted in India among over 3,000 farming families across 10 villages. Various completed and working papers from this research project will be briefly discussed.

Journal acceptance JAIS 2016

March 2, 2016

JAIS paper title: Guidelines for Conducting Mixed Methods Research: An Extension and Illustration Authors: Viswanath Venkatesh, Susan Brown, and Yulia Wati Abstract: The purpose of this study is to provide an illustration of applying the mixed methods approach proposed by Venkatesh et al. (2013). In this study, we apply the mixed methods approach to the examination of factors influencing technology adoption in households and discuss the development and validation of meta-inferences (i.e., validation of mixed methods research). The objective of the illustrative study was to understand IT adoption and use in households using a mixed methods research approach. To achieve this objective, we re-analyzed the qualitative data from Venkatesh and Brown (2001) and the quantitative data from Brown and Venkatesh (2005) by applying the guidelines for mixed methods research as put forth by Venkatesh et al. Our illustrative study indicates that the use of a mixed methods research design provides a better understanding of phenomenon of interest than the use of a singular research design. The data from the qualitative study helped identify a set of factors and the importance of these factors. The data from the quantitative study helped validate the model of technology adoption in households (identified from the qualitative study). Together, by generating meta-inferences, including possible triangulation of findings across studies, these two studies offer a deep understanding of the factors that drive IT adoption and use in households.

Journal acceptance IJHCS 2016

February 18, 2016

IJHCS paper title: Leveraging Microsoft's mobile usability guidelines: Conceptualizing and developing scales for mobile application usability Authors: Hartmut Hoehle, Ruba Aljafari, and Viswanath Venkatesh Abstract: This research conceptualizes mobile application usability and develops and validates an instrument to measure the same. Mobile application usability has attracted widespread attention in the field of human–computer interaction because well-designed applications can enhance user experiences. To conceptualize mobile application usability, we analyzed Microsoft’s mobile usability guidelines and defined 10 constructs representing mobile application usability. Next, we conducted a pilot study followed by a quantitative assessment of the content validity of the scales. We then sequentially applied exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis to two samples (n=404; n=501) consisting of German consumers using mobile social media applications on their smartphones. To evaluate the confirmatory factor model, we followed a step-by-step process assessing unidimensionality, discriminant validity and reliability. To assess the nomological validity of our instrument, we examined the impact of mobile application usability on two outcomes: continued intention to use and brand loyalty. The results confirmed that mobile application usability was a good predictor of both outcomes. The constructs and scales associated with mobile application usability validated in this paper can be used to guide future research in human–computer interaction and aid in the effective design of mobile applications.

Presentation on pursuing the United Nation’s millennium development goals in India

October 29, 2015

Prof. Venkatesh presented his research on pursuing the United Nation's millennium development goals in India and shared lessons learned from a project in villages in India. Here is an abstract of the presentation: The pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of the United Nations is of economic and social significance to the poorest citizens of less developed countries. Information and communication technologies are seen to have the potential to help achieve these goals. Yet, the presence of a digital divide, which is the gulf between information and communication technology (ICT) haves and have-nots, exists across a variety of demographic, ethnic, and geographic dimensions. Overcoming the digital divide by successfully deploying ICTs in developing countries can have major socioeconomic implications for those countries. ICTs can be a cornerstone for the development of these countries by providing better quality of life through greater access to education, health care, and government. ICT success, typically defined in terms of adoption and use, is rare, with up to 85% failing to some degree in developing countries. The goal of this presentation is to discuss one such large-scale longitudinal (10+ years) research project being conducted in India among over 3,000 farming families across 10 villages. Various completed and working papers from this research project will be briefly discussed.