Kuruzovich, J., Paczkowski, W., Golden, T., Goodarzi, S., and Venkatesh, V. “Telecommuting and Job Outcomes: A Moderated Mediation Model of System Use, Software Quality, and Social Exchange,” Information & Management, (58:3), 2021, 103431.

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This research investigates an artifact-centric view of the telecommuting experience, examining how system use and software quality influence job outcomes of telecommuters. We develop and test our moderated mediation model in a cross-organizational study of 184 teleworkers. Results show the extensive use of telecommuting systems negatively impacts social exchange processes and job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and job performance of telecommuters, underscoring limitations of virtual interactions. However, high-quality software can moderate this negative effect, because the negative relationship between telecommuting system use and job outcomes becomes nonsignificant, as telecommuting software quality increases.
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    Bala, H., Venkatesh, V., Ganster, D.C. and Rai, A. “How Does an Enterprise System Implementation Change Interpersonal Relationships in Organizations,” Industrial Management & Data Systems, (121:8), 2021, 1824-1847.

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    Although research has suggested that enterprise system (ES) implementations have major impacts on employee job characteristics and outcomes, there has been limited research that has examined the impacts of ES implementations on interpersonal relationships over time. Building on and extending recent studies that have examined changes in employee job characteristics and outcomes during an ES implementation, this research examined the nature, extent, determinants, and outcomes of changes in an important interpersonal relationship construct—coworker exchange (CWX)—following an ES implementation. CWX is considered a critical aspect of employees’ job and an important determinant of their success in the workplace. Drawing on social exchange theory, we theorize that employees will perceive a change in CWX following an ES implementation.
    A longitudinal field study over a period of 6 months among 249 employees was conducted. Latent growth modeling was used to analyze the data.
    We found that employees’ work process characteristics, namely perceived process complexity, perceived process rigidity, and perceived process radicalness, significantly explained change, i.e., decline in our case, in CWX during the shakedown phase of an ES implementation. The decreasing trajectory of change in CWX led to declining job performance and job satisfaction.
    The role of CWX and its importance in the context of ES implementations is a key novel element of this work.

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      Venkatesh, V., Aloysius, J.A., Hoehle, H., and Nikkhah, H. “Being at the Cutting Edge of Online Shopping: Role of Recommendations and Discounts on Privacy Perceptions,” Computers in Human Behavior (121), 2021, 106785.

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      Despite the explosion of selling online, customers continue to have privacy concerns about online purchases. To alleviate such concerns, shopping sites seek to employ interventions to encourage users to buy more online. Two common interventions used to promote online sales are: (1) recommendations that help customers choose the right product either based on historic purchase correlations or recommendations suggested by the retailer; and
      (2) discounts that increase the value of products. Building on privacy calculus, we theorize about how and why key, representative combinations of recommendations and discounts influence the effects of inhibitors and enablers on online purchase intention. Our research design incorporated recommendations coming from different sources for the recommendation (retailer and other customers’ preferences) product relatedness (related products with historic purchases correlated to the focal product and unrelated products with no historic purchase correlation to the focal product) and two types of discounts (regular and bundle). Participants completed a browsing task in a controlled online shopping environment and completed a survey (n = 496). We found mixed results of moderating effects of recommendations and product relatedness on the effect of inhibitors and enablers on purchase intention. Although recommendations did not enhance the effects of inhibitors, they did enhance the effects of enablers on online purchase intention. We also found that product relatedness did not enhance the effect of privacy enablers on online purchase intentions. The results also showed that discounts enhance the effects of enablers, and that discounts can counteract the moderating effect of recommendations on the relationship between inhibitors and purchase intention under certain circumstances. We discuss theoretical and practical implications.
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        Venkatesh, V. “Adoption and Use of AI Tools: A Research Agenda Grounded in UTAUT,” Annals of Operations Research, 2021.

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        This paper is motivated by the widespread availability of AI tools, whose adoption and consequent benefits are still not well understood. As a first step, some critical issues that relate to AI tools in general, humans in the context of AI tools, and AI tools in the context of operations management are identified. A discussion of how these issues could hinder employee adoption and use of AI tools is presented. Building on this discussion, the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology is used as a theoretical basis to propose individual characteristics, technology characteristics, environmental characteristics and interventions as viable research directions that could not only contribute to the adoption literature, particularly as it relates to AI tools, but also, if pursued, such research could help organizations positively influence the adoption of AI tools.
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          Chan, F. K. Y., Thong, J. Y. L., Brown, S. A., and Venkatesh, V. “Service Design and Citizen Satisfaction with E-Government Services: A Multidimensional Perspective,” Public Administration Review, (81:5), 2021, 874-894.

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           This research examines the relationship between service design and citizen satisfaction with e-government services. Based on a multidimensional conceptualization of service, we define three key service perceptions, each comprising different design characteristics, that jointly influence perceived service quality and citizen satisfaction with e government services. The service perceptions and their corresponding design characteristics are: (1) perceptions of a core service—accuracy, completeness, self-service capability, and convenience; (2) perceptions of facilitating services— accessibility, privacy protection, security protection, and user support; and (3) perceptions of supporting services— personalization capability and transparency. We tested our research model using data from a two-stage survey of 3,065 users of three e-government services. The results showed that all design characteristics contributed to their respective service perceptions that influenced perceived service quality that in turn influenced citizen satisfaction. The finding of a three-way interaction among the service perceptions supported their complementary role in influencing perceived service quality.

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